Destination Overview

Maldives

Escape into the perfection of the Maldives where an abundance of tropical marine life, world class dive centres and pristine reefs awaits. Enjoy the year-round warmth of both the sunshine and the friendly Maldivian people as you slip into a world of pure relaxation. With gorgeous stretches of sand, the beaches here are some of the most beautiful you will find and are surrounded by an underwater world of spectacular marine beauty.

Capital

Male

Language

Dhivehi

Time

GMT +5

Religion

Islam

Currency

Rufiyaa

Population

540,000

International Airports

Male

Weather

All the islands of the Maldives have a tropical monsoon climate, with little variation in maximum and minimum temperatures. The average maximum temperature is around 30 degrees Celsius (86° Fahrenheit) during the day throughout the year. At night it cools down to about 25°C (77°F). Because of the humidity it can feel very warm.

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Top Highlights

Tropical Marine Life

The many atolls of the Maldives are famous for their colourful and exotic marine life. The huge biodiversity of the Maldives is one of the largest in existence and their warm waters are filled with an abundance of fish, manta rays, sharks and turtles, amongst others.

Aquatic Activities

With exceptionally clear water and thriving marine life, the Maldives makes for a great environment for scuba diving and snorkelling. Many resorts feature reefs so close travellers can easily swim from the beach, while others offer snorkelling excursions where a boat will transport you to deeper waters and even more colourful reefs.

Luxurious Relaxation

The Maldives is well known for its stunning white sands and luxury resorts, offering superb sunshine and the warmest of welcomes. From castaway villas to overwater bungalows, the resorts of The Maldives have all the amenities and facilities you could possibly need to indulge in, and many include island transfers, exotic excursions and delectable dining experiences.

Maldives Journeys

Portugal Journeys

Lisbon

Where the old meets the new, it has an incredibly rich heritage whilst being one of the trendiest capitals in Europe. Lisbon is a very walkable city and offer spectacular hilltop views in Alfama or at St. George's Castle. One shouldn't miss a ride in the famous Tram 28, that passes some of the cities must-sees, or a long walk along the waterfront neighbourhood of Belém.

Alentejo

While to the north the pace is set by the green of the flatlands as far as the eye can see, further south the landscape combines with the sun, the heat, and a slower pace of life. The Alentejo, the idyllic heartland of Portugal, impresses with variety: deserted surf beaches and charming fishing villages on the western coastline and picturesque walled towns and forts on the boarder to Spain. An ideal place for those that wish to escape the tourist crowds and dive into the authentic Portugal.

Sintra

Where the old meets the new, it has an incredibly rich heritage whilst being one of the trendiest capitals in Europe. Lisbon is a very walkable city and offer spectacular hilltop views in Alfama or at St. George's Castle. One shouldn't miss a ride in the famous Tram 28, that passes some of the cities must-sees, or a long walk along the waterfront neighbourhood of Belém.

Porto

Be it the millennium-old cathedral or the latest molecular gastropub, the city of Porto is really a living heritage, one that reinvents itself while maintaining its core character. A vibrant and fascinating city, world-famous for the production of Port wine, matured in vast cellars that stretch along the banks of Douro River. But Porto is more than that: rich culture, a buzzing nightlife, captivating tourist attractions and many more is waiting to be discovered.

Obidos

Discover this delightful town of white houses adorned with bougainvillea and honeysuckle, surrounded by its castle medieval walls. Considered as one of the most characterful places of central Portugal it is a symbol of a traditional Portuguese city. The surrounding region is equally fascinating, not far away from Lisbon and ideal for a day trip.

Douro Valley

A dream made of enchanted valleys, unscathed nature, and world heritage sites; in its steep vineyards is where Port Wine is produced. The Douro Valley in northern Portugal is the oldest wine-growing region in the world and was designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site. The cultivation of wine here dates back to the Roman's. With all these centuries-old vineyards running along the Douro River, the area is a must-visit for gourmets and vine-lovers and shouldn't be missed during a stay in Portugal.

Insider Journeys
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